Courses designed to surface and grow your foresight capacities

So many courses about foresight now. What different about mine?

I recently launched my first online courses about ‘finding and using your foresight’. My aim was to design courses that were accessible (not outrageously expensive) and self-paced, and supported by me for questions during the courses.

I set them up first as email courses — one lesson a day, the drip feed approach. I quickly discovered that these platforms were a bit too much like email marketing and I wasn’t going there. So I put them on my Foresight Futures site in a private members area to ensure the course…


When futures studies began to emerge in the 1960s, its focus was a specific process — forecasting and the Delphi method at the RAND corporation. Since then the field has developed and formalised around a range of different processes, with scenario planning becoming a dominant method over time. That is changing at the moment as more open, participatory, citizen based processes are being used. This process focus is well recognised in the futures literature, and a theory basis for the field is also developing.

I started thinking about this recently when I saw another attempt to use foresight as a…


I have been working — on and off — with the delightful people in the Foresight Futures Community who are helping me test my Futures Conversations Framework (FCF) to make it practical. It’s a slow process though because I keep getting distracted by other things that I also want to do (like my new courses).

When I read posts, papers and articles about futures and foresight work — which I do daily — I am now always reminded of the urgent need for something like the FCF, and that I need to get moving with its development. …


Duelling terminology. By Thomas Marx, Shutterstock
Image by Thomas Marx, Shutterstock

Okay, I will admit it up front that I am a bit of a purist at times. When it comes to grammar (less so as I grow older), and words, and futures and foresight. I read the word futurism this morning to tag a futures article and I felt that familiar reaction in my brain — a bit like a physical gag reaction. Again I thought — yuck (personal feeling there, valid for me, maybe not for you).

It’s an inaccurate term for me, and an ‘ism’ that just isn’t necessary, and that borrows from an art movement. I thought…


I presented on my Futures Conversations Framework* at the Global Foresight Summit this week. What a wonderful, inspiring and powerful event that was! Miguel, Francisco and colleagues from FFWD — Futures Intelligence & Strategic Foresight should be well pleased with their work. Thank you. You can find a recording of my presentation on You Tube. Just skip to about the 1.15 point in the video to avoid all my weird facial expressions!

This is the second post about the Framework — read the first here — and my presentation triggered me to write again. I don’t like public speaking much…


So many podcasts. So many conversations. Where to start?

© C. Schüßler

I’m drowning in a sea of podcasts—so many conversations. The problem could be of course that I don’t carve out time in my day to actually listen to them, but I’ve begun to wonder why podcasts are the ‘in thing’. How much inspiration do we need?

It may also have something to do with me thinking better when I write. It’s why I ask people to email me with any questions they have rather than ask me to spare 30 minutes of my time for an online chat. …


April 24, 2021

It’s been almost three months since I launched my revamped Thinking Futures as Foresight Futures. Since then, there’s been a lot of thinking, a lot of experimenting, and I established the Foresight Futures Members community. So it’s probably time for an update.

At the core of my work now is the Futures Conversations Framework which was developed in my PhD. The Members community is a space to explore this frame in a collaborative way, to ensure it can be made practical for everyday use. …


It’s been almost three months since I launched my revamped Thinking Futures as Foresight Futures. Since then, there’s been a lot of thinking, a lot of experimenting, and I established the Foresight Futures Members community. So it’s probably time for an update.

At the core of my work now is the Futures Conversations Framework which was developed in my PhD. The Members community is a space to explore this frame in a collaborative way, to ensure it can be made practical for everyday use. …


I'm not sure inflection points 'define the future'. As you write, they show us new opportunities, new futures that we couldn't see before because of the constraints of linear thinking. There are always multiple futures available to us in the present - we just have to find them before the inflection point occurs: new thinking, new futures, new actions in the present.


A new start, a reframed approach focusing on new conversations about futures.

I spent a fair bit of the last few years writing my PhD on university futures. Part of my PhD was the development of a futures conversations framework, based on Integral Futures, as a way of generating new conversations about possible futures for the university. I ‘road-tested’ the framework at a few conferences during the research and it seemed to be well received. …

Maree Conway

Foresight practitioner helping people have new conversations about possible futures.

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